Recording Art Videos with a Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920

Recording Art Videos with a Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920

* If you follow the affiliate product links below and make a qualified purchase through Amazon and Blick Art Materials within 24 hours of clicking, I earn a commission at no additional cost to you. (Yay!)

Are you looking into recording your artistic process for Youtube or Instagram? Have you been propping your smartphone up on random books and varnish containers to try and get the right angles?

I have a solution for you.

In 2017, I started recording my videos with an old Nikon point and shoot camera and a tripod. The tripod legs always got in the way and the video quality was poor.  Then I tried my Canon Rebel T3i, which created high quality video, but I was only able to record 11 minutes at a time due to storage limits. Then I switched to using my Samsung Galaxy phone, but ran out of storage too quickly and couldn’t listen to music at the same time.

I didn’t want to buy a really expensive camera, because I really couldn’t justify the expense on something like this, so I did some more research.

I finally found my favorite Recording solution:

A Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920 with a Scissor Arm Desk Mount Stand 

This is my current setup:

I have recently painted my desktop white, but here is a current example of what my videos look like after recording with the Logitech webcam and editing with Adobe Premier Pro:

In any situation where you are recording or photographing art:

Make sure you have a well lit work area. I always use clamp lights with daylight bulbs in my studio. I also have daylight bulbs in all of my light fixtures.

A great camera with crappy lighting won’t produce a great video unless you really know what you’re doing.

Logitech c920 Webcam Pros

  • It’s fairly cheap (around $50)
  • It records 1080p HD video
  • Video quality is perfect for Youtube as well as Instagram
  • I can record straight to my laptop and easily import into Premier Pro
  • Logitech software is easy to use and you can manipulate the camera settings easily.
  • It’s really easy to adjust the angle of the webcam when using the scissor arm mount.

Cons

  • I haven’t played with the audio, so I can’t speak to its quality. Since I record time lapse videos most often, I just delete the audio track.
  • I experienced camera flicker once (black bars moving through the video), but this was easily remedied by adjusting the camera settings through the Logitech software.
  • You’ll need to have your computer with a USB port setup near your work to record.
  • I usually have to adjust the settings in the software every time I open it.

Even with the cons, I think the awesome price makes up for everything. I completely love using this webcam for recording. It’s an inexpensive way to get into recording and building your artistic brand on Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and more.

Videos are a great way to get exposure for your art, so I encourage you to start recording in any way you can. It has made me a very happy artist.

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If you have any questions or comments, please let me know. Check out my FAQs page for more info on the products I use!

-Kelly

P.S. If you enjoy my blogs and gain any inspiration from the content I put out there, please consider becoming a Patron of Messy Ever After on Patreon. Pledging just $1 a month enables me to keep doing what I do. Plus, you get extra little perks like phone wallpapers and the ability to pick my brain whenever you want through the artist Q&A perk.

Recommended Products:

Further Reading:

How to Photograph Your Art on a Budget

Air Compressor for Manipulating Fluid Paint

Silicone Spray to Create Cells

Silicone Spray to Create Cells

I don’t like to mix silicone into my fluid paints very often, because I like to be able to control my paint with more precision.

When silicone is mixed into your paints before pouring, the cells that form can very easily become distorted if you move the paint around too much–I lack the patience required to spread the paint slowly enough to keep the cells intact.

Most of the cells you see in my work are either formed by the varying viscosity of the paints I use, or the silicone spray I apply AFTER I’m done manipulating the paint. Like this:

As you can see in the video, the cells are little baby cells. Not the dramatic large cells you get when mixing silicone directly into your paints.

What will you need?

* If you follow the affiliate product links below and make a qualified purchase through Amazon and Blick Art Materials within 24 hours of clicking, I earn a commission at no additional cost to you. (Yay!)

You will need a spray bottle with a fine mist, not something that squirts a stream. The bottle I use came with some random art supplies kit I bought years ago, so I can’t link the same product. BUT, Amazon helped me out, and after reading a bunch of reviews, this product seems adequate: http://amzn.to/2EKr3fR. No guarantees. I have not tested it.

You will also need 100% silicone and rubbing alcohol.

Recipe:

  • Small spray bottle with a fine mist
  • 1/3 100% Silicone- http://amzn.to/2CDMC0C
  • 2/3 Rubbing alcohol/Isopropyl alcohol (cheapest in drug stores or places like Target. Doesn’t really matter what strength you use. mine is 70% at the moment.)

Mix the silicone and alcohol together and shake vigorously before each use. I recommend spraying once or twice on a test surface before moving to your painting.

When I use this, I just do one spritz. Maybe two if the canvas is larger. You can watch the cells slowly start to form like magic!

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Thanks for reading! Check out my Product Details and Reviews for more info on what I use in my studio!

-Kelly

P.S. If you enjoy my blogs and gain any inspiration from the content I put out there, please consider becoming a Patron of Messy Ever After on Patreon. Pledging just $1 a month enables me to keep doing what I do. Plus, you get extra little perks like phone wallpapers and the ability to pick my brain whenever you want through the artist Q&A perk.

My Fluid Paint Recipe

Air Compressor for Manipulating Fluid Paint

Air Compressor Alternatives

Air Compressor Alternatives

Want to try out my method of blowing paint around with an air compressor, but are you too cheap to buy one?

Look at how fun that is:

I have two solutions for you!

* If you follow the affiliate product links below and make a qualified purchase through Amazon or Blick Art Materials within 24 hours of clicking, I earn a commission at no additional cost to you. (Yay!)

Solutions:
  • A straw and good set of lungs.
    • My lungs are tiny and I got lightheaded very quickly using this method. I do not recommend using on large canvases.
  • Cans of compressed air.
    • These are great to test this technique, but can be wasteful if you start using a lot of them. I bought a two pack and was onto the second one by the time knew I needed an air compressor.
    • The cans can freeze your paint if you use them too long, and spray too close to the canvas

Other alternatives that I have considered but did not test:
  • A foot pump for bikes or inflatable toys. (Could work, but you will have a hard time getting a consistent and prolonged stream of air.)
  • A compressor for air brushing (I did not test this, because after reading the max PSI, I assumed there wouldn’t be enough pressure to achieve the results I wanted.)
  • An electric air pump (I fear the same situation as the air brush compressor. Not enough pressure.)

***

Thanks for reading! Check out my Product Details and Reviews for more info on what I use in my studio!

-Kelly

P.S. If you enjoy my blogs and gain any inspiration from the content I put out there, please consider becoming a Patron of Messy Ever After on Patreon. Pledging just $1 a month enables me to keep doing what I do. Plus, you get extra little perks like phone wallpapers and the ability to pick my brain whenever you want through the artist Q&A perk.

Air Compressor for Manipulating Fluid Paint

My Fluid Paint Recipe